Strange tire leak (motorcycle)

Discussion in 'General Truck Repair' started by chris887/ajohnson, Apr 24, 2017.

  1. I have an extra motorcycle that rarely gets ridden. Had new tires and tubes put on last spring and havent had any problems until recently. The bike sat for about a month, and the front tire was completely flat, rear tire was fine. I filled the tire and checked for punctures/leaks and could not find any. I rode it around then parked it in the garage. Checked the tire the next day, no pressure loss. I let it sit in the garage for a week without moving it, rechecked the pressure, still no loss. Now 2 days later, it still has not moved and the tire is completely flat again. This makes no sense to me, any suggestions?
     
    mountaingote and chopper103in like this.
  2. chopper103in

    chopper103in Head Dog

    Check that the valve core is tight all the way into the valve stem
     
  3. Thank you for the suggestion. I just checked. The core seemed a little loose and the tip was sticking out just slightly above the stem. I snugged it up, now the tip is slightly recessed in the stem, hopefully that was the problem.
     
  4. flyingmusician

    flyingmusician Official ORD Rocker

    Chopper beat me to it but I had the same problem on my sportster. Doesn't take much if it isn't fully seated when it's parked in just the right position it'll develop that slow leak at the stem.

    Work wonderfully on ex wives cars as well. Or so I've been told.
     
  5. RedForeman

    RedForeman ORD Official Scholar

    You haven't put in the summer air yet.
     
  6. Prince of 'Doc'ness

    Prince of 'Doc'ness ORD Founder Staff Member

    Gotta put the breeze on yer knees....
     
    mountaingote likes this.
  7. mountaingote

    mountaingote Gote With a Tude & a BIG Hammer Staff Member

    Air in yer hair. ...
     
    Prince of 'Doc'ness likes this.
  8. Prince of 'Doc'ness

    Prince of 'Doc'ness ORD Founder Staff Member

    98% of all Harleys ever sold are still on the road. The other 2% made it home....
     
  9. mountaingote

    mountaingote Gote With a Tude & a BIG Hammer Staff Member

    What do a Harley and a German Shepherd have in common?





    They both like to ride in the back of a pickup...
     
  10. GAnthony

    GAnthony Official ORD Oddball

    i have had tubeless tires and spoked wheels, no such thing for me. my bikes too would be parked at least a week at a time, before i could get out and ride them. normal for any tire car, bike, truck, to lose "up to" 2 psi a month. maybe the valve core is gummed up, from the powder inside of the tubes, and with condensation, not allowing the valve stem to seat fully..??
     
    Vilhiem and chopper103in like this.
  11. Where have you been? How are you doing? It hasbeen fine so far since I tightened up the valve core, so I'm hoping that was the problem. My bike shop told me that I need tubes with spoke wheels, I would rather not have tubes if I don't need them
     
  12. GAnthony

    GAnthony Official ORD Oddball

    yes, the one bike i had, (my last one) had those cool looking bicycle spoked wheels, and yes, they had to have tubes. i vaguely remember that if the rubber band that runs inside the wheel is not seated correctly, the spoke nipple will poke thru a tube, and that sucks, as now, i know i would go out and buy yet another new tube.

    what i also thought too, was like i said, there is a fine powder inside the tubes, and then we have the possibility of moisture getting into the tube, from a non-filtered air compressor. this as well as condensation due to temperature differences depending on where the bike is parked. so that fine powder can become like sludge, and seep out, under air pressure, and clog up the valve stem/core.

    i never had a garage, nor a shed, so my bikes alway stayed outside, till winter time, when i'd take them to the dealership for winter storage. (it was way cheaper for the dealer to store them, then one of those "storage places", and then too, the dealership had better security)
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017

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